(503) 223-8569 office@pdxaa.org
May 2014 Volume 7, No. 5

May 2014 Volume 7, No. 5

Sobriety in Stumptown www.pdxaa.com  Portland Area Intergroup  May 2014 Submit to:                                825 NE 20th Ave, Portland, OR            Volume 7, No. 5 newsletter@pdxaa.com                         503­223­8569 NEWS: June Intergroup Meeting Moved to 6/16 submitted by Anita B. June’s IGR meeting will take place the third Monday of June instead of the 2nd Monday as usual. Mark your calendars for June 16th this month! 3123 NE 24th Ave, Portland, 7pm. “Big Chunks of Truth” 4th Step Workshop submitted by Patrick W. May 17th from 10:00am­11:30am at the Trinity United Methodist Church: 3915 SE Steele St, Portland. The panelists are Gary S. and Erica W. from John’s Landing group. Check the website calendar for the flyer. AA Hotline Volunteer Shifts Available submitted by Denise M. The Portland Intergroup AA Hotline is open for business 24 hours a day, so anyone can get help or assistance whenever they need it. When the Portland Intergroup office is closed, the hotline phone number is forwarded to AA volunteers who make sure there’s someone on the other end of the line. Volunteer for a shift and be a part of keeping our hotline hot. Shifts are every other week for about five hours apiece. The following shifts are available: 1 ­Wednesday 11pm­5am ­Wednesday 5am­9am ­Thursday 5­11pm ­Saturday 1­6pm ­Sunday 6­11pm Please note: The hotline calls are screened by the answering service and forwarded to the volunteer’s home phone; callers never see the home phone number of the volunteer. May, June & July: “Sex, Drugs & Rock and Roll” by Editor David B. of Portland, OR We put our heads together as a committee and asked: what do Portland­area AA’s truly want to hear about? The answers, of course, were: sex, drugs and rock and roll! This month, we’re talking about sex. June and July’s issues are about drugs and rock and roll. Here’s what we’re looking for: June: “DRUGS” *deadline 06/01/14 Do you think it’s unacceptable to talk about drugs in AA meetings? Do you think’s it’s no big deal? Are alcohol and drugs “all the same addiction?” Why? Why can’t alcoholics smoke pot if that was never their problem? What about other drugs? Have you had to deal with taking addictive prescription medications in sobriety? How did you do it? When does an alcoholic cross the line with prescription medication use? July: “ROCK AND ROLL AND THE ARTS” *deadline 07/01/14 Music and the arts are famous for the alcoholics among their ranks, and Portland AA is bursting at the seams with talent. Did music bring you to your bottom or did it pick you back up from the depths? How did you deal with playing at clubs and bars after getting sober? Did sobriety reconnect you with your passion for art? Did your program convince you to go for your dreams and pursue a career as an artist? Did working a program give you the discipline you needed to succeed at your passion? We want to hear about it! And before we go into this month’s stories, let us turn to page 69 and remember that: “We do not want to be the arbiter of anyone’s sex conduct. We all have sex problems. We’d hardly be human if we didn’t. What can we do about them?” STORIES: The Grace of a Woman by Anonymous My first relationship in recovery began 13 months into my sobriety. I took my sponsor’s suggestion and waited a year to date. My partner was in recovery which made it easier 2 because I knew they had a spiritual foundation in place. Sadly, my first AA relationship ended six months after it had begun. But I couldn’t have asked for a more amazing first try at a relationship in recovery. I learned how to set boundaries and state my feelings rather than screaming and storming off to the nearest shot of vodka. We got along famously; not because we could drink together, but because we understood one another and wanted the best for each other. We explored forests and camped, went to awesome concerts, discovered new food, we laughed, we cried and played like only sober kids know how to. One sunny morning I looked at this human and realized he wasn’t “mine” like I had always believed my boyfriends to be while drinking, but that he was his own, and I loved him even more for that. I didn’t have to carry anyone, ever again. Standing beside them is where I am meant to be. Our relationship was as good as ever, but I had to know, did he see me in his future? Did he feel that “spark”? His answer was honest but not what I wanted to hear. I wasn’t the woman he saw in his future, it just wasn’t me. Before Alcoholics Anonymous, I would have hung on for dear life, kicking and screaming, until my world crashed down around me. But that day, I knew I could not stay in a relationship where I could not get the love I both needed and deserved. I had built a good foundation in recovery and called every woman I could. When I was drinking, people always told me, “no one else can love you until you love yourself.” I just never got the handbook on how to do that. When I came to AA people said, “we’ll love you until you learn how to love yourself.” And each day I have a woman to show me what that looks like. Today, I know the difference between weakness and vulnerability. Today, when I am hurting and sad, I pray to my Creator for strength and serenity. Today, I am able to carry myself with the grace of a woman, not the fear of a child. The Purging of the Past Encounters From a Previous Life by Anonymous As I sit here writing this, I am waiting on a text message from an ex­girlfriend.  This is the third ex that I have encountered in the past week, all from out of town, and all wanting to reconnect with me after some time has passed.  I have been sober for 415 days now and it has been quite an interesting year full of fear, hope, and change.  I haven’t noticed anything drastic as far as the change in myself goes, but others have.  From 30 days on, people have been telling me how they have noticed my demeanor has changed and there is a look in my eye that was absent when I arrived in the rooms…Neither of the three exes have mentioned any such change… My sex conduct while attending the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous has been anything but wholesome, genuine, correct, cute, pretty, nice, or any other good word associated with sex in sobriety.  It’s not like I’ve been an untamed beast running rampant through the streets of Portland terrorizing onlookers with my devious ways or anything, but the sex part of my 3 sobriety is prooobably the weakest brick in the house I’ve built so far. Just like when looking back at my drinking, not all of it has been misery, but for the most part, the way I have conducted myself has been less than desirable…to me…Progress not perfection, right? I had a girlfriend entering the rooms and that quickly ended within the first thirty days, which seems to be somewhat textbook whilst looking back on my own, as well as other’s experiences.  The unwritten rule of “no relationships” in the first year went way out the door nearing my sixth month and I thought I had a really strong grasp of sobriety.  Actually, I thought I knew EVERYTHING about sobriety because I was nearing six months.  Yes, yes, yes, I was wrong!  I tried dating an awesome young woman outside of the rooms which inherently ended in disaster.  It was mainly due to me withholding my true thoughts and feelings throughout the duration of our escapade (it only lasted about three weeks!). Luckily enough, she is a normie and does not lack proper reasoning unlike my alcoholic brain, so we are still friends.  After the relationship attempt, I was somewhat loose but at least very direct on what I asked for out of the opposite sex for a little while.  Just like everybody says, it doesn’t work out all that well! Someone always ends up getting hurt! I then had the bright idea to contact some of the ex­girlfriends of the past to basically tell them how good I was doing and also make really half­assed attempts at amends with them.  I can’t tell you how quickly that has turned around to bite me in the ass.  I called each and every one of them with honest attempts at having a good discussion on where each of us had been over our departed time from each other and how I had changed my behavior. They all accepted my amends a little too graciously.  Every second conversation found me speaking with them about dating THEM again and what I wanted from them which, had I paused, would never have come out of my mouth.   Three are in Portland now, and all three are looking for answers. Let me tell you that having women interested in me has been quite the ego booster, but in reality it is not what I was after.  My ideals for what I would like out of a partner has drastically changed after my fourth and fifth step, but in all honesty, the women I have talked to, as well as who have talked back to me, have not changed a bit.  That is because in the sex conduct department of my sobriety, I myself have not changed a bit.  I continue to demonstrate the exact same behaviors as I did before entering the rooms of Alcoholics Anonymous.  I thought that at around six months of my sobriety, I had it on lockdown.  I knew everything and it was smooth­sailing from then on.  At just over 13 months sober I am singing a different tune for sure.  I am now learning how to put the past to rest and allow the past to be the past. There is good reason why none of the exes that I encountered have noticed a change. This is simply due to the fact that change comes from within and change takes time.  In my sobriety, I have changed drastically over the last year in many departments of my life.  Many people that I have known my entire life, as well as friends that I have just met within the last year have all noticed drastic change.  My exes haven’t said a word.  Coincidence? I think not… Online Dating in Sobriety: Tried it. Hated it. Learned a 4 Ton. by Anonymous Alcoholism is a disease of loneliness.  We’ve all read that and/or heard that line.  Hell, we’ve probably all said it at least once.  Fervently.  Because it is true.  We alcoholics ARE lonely.  We isolate. We think we are “different from” everyone else.  We think we are wounded in some way, broken, maybe even disabled.  “Less than.”  Perhaps unloveable.   It’s also said that alcoholics become even lonelier after becoming sober.  I can see that.  I know I am lonelier ­ romantic­date­wise ­ than ever before.  Why?  Because today I have standards, morals, and I try to make well­considered choices.  But my choices are usually deciding between attending an AA Speaker Meeting or staying home to watch “All About Eve” with a mug of hot chocolate ­ not deciding if I say “yes” to Tom, Dick, or Harry.  When I became sober, I gave up my training wheels, lost my alcohol­laced safety net, and gained a snugly form­fitting armor suit of malleable confidence. Regardless, I feel very blessed to be an alcoholic in recovery.  I feel so lucky to have a supportive community of people who understand me as soon as I introduce myself, “Hi.  My name is [anonymous], and I am an alcoholic.”  I walk into an AA meeting and I am walking into a family room ­ a living room.  A safe room.  A haven.  But when you are single and looking to date, sometimes even safe havens can feel incestuous because you are hanging out with your FAMILY, for God’s sake.  And sometimes it’s hard to meet other single people when you aren’t going into bars or clubs anymore.  So some of us try online dating.  At least, that’s what I did. I am fifty­three and single.  And I would like to have a partner to love and share my life with ­ my sober life with.  So, I joined the  “Premier Social Network for Singles Over Fifty.”  And now that  my  online  dating  “career”  is  over, ...
June 2014 Volume 7, No. 5

June 2014 Volume 7, No. 5

May, June & July: “Sex, Drugs & Rock and Roll” by Editor David B. of Portland, OR We put our heads together as a committee and asked: what do Portland­area AA’s truly want to hear about? The answers, of course, were: sex, drugs and rock and roll! This month, we’re talking about drugs. Next month’s issue is about rock and roll and we’re seeking submissions. Here’s what we’re looking for: July: “ROCK AND ROLL AND THE ARTS” *deadline 07/07/14 Music and the arts are famous for the alcoholics among their ranks, and Portland AA is bursting at the seams with talent. Did music bring you to your bottom or did it pick you back up from the depths? How did you deal with playing at clubs and bars after getting sober? Did sobriety reconnect you with your passion for art? Did your program convince you to go for your dreams and pursue a career as an artist? Did working a program give you the discipline you needed to succeed at your passion? We want to hear about it! JUNE STORIES: Just Two Pills by Dave A My name is Dave and I’m an alcoholic. My story starts out just like a lot of others in AA. I drank and did some drugs because that’s what we did coming out of High School. We partied a lot and it was pretty fun. Then one day it changed. I got up one morning, hopped in the shower and noticed that part of body had changed. Three days later I was sitting on an exam table listening to a Doctor tell me that...